When choosing a suitably qualified surgeon and registered hospital, what questions should you ask to help make the right decision?

  1. Does your selected Consultant Surgeon specialise in the area of surgery you are considering and has he/she worked in both the NHS and the private sector for a significant length of time?
     
  2. Is your selected Consultant Surgeon registered with the General Medical Council (GMC) and included on the GMC specialist register for plastic surgery?
     
  3. In case of emergency during your immediate recovery period, does your chosen surgeon reside near the address of the hospital he/she is working in and is he/she accessible throughout your hospital stay and immediate post-operative recovery period?
     
  4. Is your chosen hospital registered with the Healthcare Commission and appropriately equipped with specialist plastic surgery resources, and staffed with appropriately trained and experienced medical and clinical staff?
     
  5. Does your chosen hospital have appropriately trained clinical personnel, trained to deal in the delivery of emergency care 24hours/7 days per week?
     
  6. Does your chosen hospital seem willing to let you visit their facilities and insist that you consult with the Consultant Surgeon who will perform your operation before attempting to confirm a procedure date?
     
  7. Does your chosen Consultant and hospital project a professional and responsible attitude, ensuring that you are well informed of all risks of surgery prior to expecting you to make any commitment to undergo a procedure?
     
  8. Does your Consultant and hospital advise you that the Healthcare Commission expects all prospective cosmetic surgery patients to have a 14 day "cooling off period" following consultation and before proceeding with surgery?

 

CAUTION!

 

Unless all eight of the above questions are answered with a YES, then you may be unnecessarily compromising the quality of your surgery and are possibly considering a questionable hospital or surgery.

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